Re-generating CHAT online symposium: Learning from Learners: Power, Resistance and Learners’ Voices in an Era of Uncertainty

One outcome of the Re-generating CHAT project is an online invited symposium to be held as part of European Association of Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI) SIG conference on July 1-3, 2020. There is still room in the conference and there is no fee for participation. There is also other interesting program in the conference, see https://earli.org/SIG10-21-25

The invited symposium is titled Learning from Learners: Power, Resistance and  Learners’ Voices in an Era of Uncertainty. (Scheduled on July 2, at 5 pm Central European Summer Time)

The symposium was originally accepted in the Cultural-historical SIG of AERA 2020 conference (see the info below)


Please note that the deadline for registrations is already on June 15th. If interested, you can register here: https://earli.org/SIG10-21-25#practical-info

Hope to see you there!
On behalf of the conference organizers and the symposium organizers,
Antti Rajala (Co-coordinator of EARLI SIG on Educational Theory)

Learning from Learners: Power, Resistance and  Learners’ Voices in an Era of Uncertainty

Organisers: Charles Underwood, University of California, Berkeley, United States; Mara Mahmood, University of California Berkeley, United States; Sophina ChoudryUniversity of Manchester, United Kingdom; Arturo Cortez, University of Colorado, Boulder, United States; Alfredo Jornet, University of Oslo, Department of Teacher Education and School Research, Spain; Antti Rajala, University of Helsinki, Finland; Michael Bakal, University of Berkeley, United States; M. Lisette Lopez, Univeristy of California, Berkeley, United States; Kalonji Nzinga, University of Colorado at Boulder, United States; José Ramón Lizárraga, University of Colorado, United States; Mike Cole, University of California, San Diego, United States

Chairs: Mara Mahmood, University of California Berkeley, United States; Charles Underwood, University of California, Berkeley, United States; Kalonji Nzinga, University of Colorado at Boulder, United States

Discussants:  Angela Booker, University of California, San Diego, United States; Anna Stetsenko, The Graduate Center of the City University of New York, United States

Abstract

This symposium engages panelists and participants in the exploration and re-conceptualization of “learners’ voices” from a cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT) perspective that approaches education as a struggle to overcome dominant paradigms that thwart learners’ development and agency in the face of an uncertain future. As part of a larger effort to re-generate CHAT, this symposium will articulate and elaborate the concept of “learners’ voices” as a tool for guiding students, teachers, researchers, activists, and policy-makers in re-orienting pedagogy to cultivate their critical voices, empowering learners to become agentive sociopolitical actors in charge of their own futures-in-the-making. The concept of voice has been used in educational research, design and practice for calling out and naming the hidden power relations in systems of oppression and plays a role in learner-centered approaches (Corbett & Wilson, 1995) culturally-relevant pedagogies (Ladson-Billings 1994; Lee, 2006), hybrid language education (Gutiérrez, 1999), and critical race theories and pedagogies (Mensah, 2019). 

Panelists reconceptualize voice as “learners’ voices” broadly to convey agentive engagement in meaning making in the face of unequal power relations. While the panelists work in different social contexts (see presentation abstracts) all employ the concept of “learners’ voices” and explore ways of encouraging multivoicedness, speaking truth to power, and recognizing learners’ voices as an educational necessity in an uncertain global context. The structure of the symposium encourages dialogue designed to promote the collective co-construction and development of the concept of “learners’ voices” as a critical tool for expanding our understanding of teaching and learning.

Papers

Participatory Design Research for Climate Resilience and Activism

Michael Bakal, University of Berkeley, United States

“Trump Would Just Get Sucked Into a Black Hole”: Youthful Digital Imaginings of New Futures

José Ramón Lizárraga, University of Colorado, United States; Arturo Cortez, University of Colorado, Boulder, United States

Contradictory Activities Leading to Differential Learning in a Heterogeneous Mathematics Classroom

Sophina Choudry, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

“It’s Rigged!”: The Disruption That Reverberates When Youth Vocalize That the System Is Fixed

M. Lisette Lopez, Univeristy of California, Berkeley, United States; Kalonji Nzinga, University of Colorado at Boulder, United States

Learners’ Voices and the Transformation of Schooling Towards a Sustainable Society

Alfredo Jornet, University of Oslo, Department of Teacher Education and School Research, Spain; Antti Rajala, University of Helsinki, Finland

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